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Report shows African-Americans, Latinos are less likely to receive mortgages

February 24th, 2011

African-Americans and Latinos are less likely to receive mortgage loans as the housing crisis has deepened, according to a recent report from ComplianceTech, a provider of technology and mortgage data analysis for government agencies, nonprofits and financial institutions. The analysis of data from 2004 to 2009 shows that there are disparities in the availability of mortgage credit to African-Americans and Latinos. Members of these groups have more difficulty financing a home regardless of whether they are new home buyers or homeowners looking to refinance.

The sub-prime mortgage crisis

The analysis also debunks the erroneous notion that mortgage lending to minorities was at the root of the sub-prime mortgage crisis. Data in the report show that whites actually received the highest number and dollar volume of sub-prime mortgage loans, and are likely to have more mortgage loans in foreclosure. Whites received 4.1 million sub-prime mortgages between 2004 and 2009, Latinos 1.3 million, African-Americans 1.2 million and Asians 179,000.

The report states:

As the foreclosure crisis threatens the financial stability and mobility of families across the country, it will be particularly devastating to African American and Latino families, who already lag behind their white counterparts in terms of income, wealth and educational attainment. Furthermore, the indirect losses in wealth that result from foreclosures as a result of depreciation to nearby properties will disproportionately impact communities of color.Fewer prime mortgages

African-Americans and Latinos have lower origination rates and higher costs when they are approved for mortgages. Between 2004 and 2009 the market share of prime rate mortgage loans for African-Americans fell 62.67 percent and 61.62 percent for Latinos. The market share of prime rate mortgages grew 12.54 percent for whites and 19.6 percent for Asians.

All racial groups experienced a decline in the volume of prime mortgage loans. African-American prime loan volume plunged to $19.5 billion in 2008 from $82 billion in 2004. Latino prime mortgage loan volume fell to $40.2 billion in 2009 from $171 billion in 2004. Prime mortgage loan volume for whites fell to $876 billion in 2009 from $1.2 trillion in 2004, while Asians saw loan volume decline to $90.6 billion in 2009 from $121 billion in 2004. However, white and Asian borrowers saw increases in prime loan volume between 2008 and 2009, while African-Americans and Latinos experienced declines.

Using a cash windfall as a down payment on a home

February 18th, 2011

Should you use an inheritance or other cash windfall as a down payment on a home? Obviously, the more money you have for a down payment the better. But is getting a mortgage loan to buy a home the best use of your money at this time?

Do you have a lot of debt?

Owning a home is part of the American dream. But it can be easy to rush into home ownership without really being ready for all the financial responsibilities. For instance, many people apply for mortgage loans even though they have a lot of credit card debt, auto loans, student loans and other bills. Take a careful inventory of your finances and decide whether it makes more sense to use a cash windfall to pay off some of your debt, especially high-interest debt like credit cards.

Do you have emergency savings?

Owning a home means that you’ll be responsible for all maintenance and repair costs. It is not a good idea to purchase a home without having money set aside in savings for routine maintenance and other projects that may come up. It is also important to have money in savings for other emergencies that may occur, such as car repairs, medical expenses or a sudden drop in income. If you have little or no money saved up, you may be better off using your windfall to boost savings.

Do you anticipate a large expense soon?

Are you about to send your kid to college or anticipating some other important event that will cost big bucks? Put together a spending strategy that prioritizes future expenses. As you go through the numbers it may become apparent that this is not the time to get a mortgage to buy a home. You also may find that you need to put together a budget so that you can take care of your financial obligations and still save up for buying a place in the future.

Take time to plan ahead

Avoid rushing into home ownership even if you can qualify for a home mortgage. Too many Americans have made the mistake of getting mortgage loans when they really could not afford them. If you need help knocking out debt and building up a savings, get help from a debt counselor. If you do receive a windfall for a significant amount, a knowledgeable financial adviser can help you figure out the best way to handle it.

Getting rid of a troubled home loan

February 11th, 2011

Are you desperate to get rid of your mortgage problems? You are not alone. Zillow recently reported that 27 percent of U.S. homeowners are underwater on mortgage loans. There also were 261,333 foreclosure filings in January, according to RealtyTrac.

But homeowners dealing with foreclosure and underwater home loans aren’t the only one struggling. Some borrowers are struggling to make monthly mortgage payments due to a drop in income, job layoff, illness or some other factor beyond their control. There is no easy solution to dealing with mortgage problems, but there are several options to consider.

Sell your home

Getting rid of a mortgage loan is the best option if you really can’t afford to make the payments. Just because you sell the property you currently live in doesn’t mean you won’t be able to purchase another home in the future. Find out what’s going on in your neighborhood in terms of home sales. If there have been a lot of foreclosures, the value of your home is likely to be affected. But even if you are underwater on a mortgage loan that doesn’t mean you have to give up the idea of selling. But you may have to consider a short sale.

A short sale occurs when the mortgage lender agrees to accept a lower payoff that what you owe on a home loan. The advantage to doing a short sale is that the lender can recover some of what’s owed. You would be able to get out from under a troubled loan and avoid foreclosure. Keep in mind that any mortgage debt that is forgiven by the mortgage lender in such a deal may be taxable, so it’s important to consult with a tax advisor.

Mortgage refinancing

Maybe you are feeling pinched by monthly mortgage payments, but things haven’t gotten so serious that you are about to lose you home. If you still have some home equity and good credit, you might qualify for a mortgage refinance. The more equity you have and the higher your credit score the better. Refinancing could be the right move it you are paying interest that is much higher than current mortgage rates. A mortgage payment calculator can help determine how much money you could actually save by refinancing.

These are just a few ways to get out from under expensive mortgage payments. There may be other solutions that suit your financial needs. Talk with your mortgage lender or a housing counselor to learn more about your options.

Cash-in refinances break record in 4th quarter

February 3rd, 2011

More homeowners than ever paid down mortgage loan balances while refinancing their homes in the fourth-quarter of 2010, according to Freddie Mac. During the period, 46 percent of homeowners who refinanced mortgages brought cash to closing to lower their principal balance. That is the highest “cash-in” share since Freddie Mac began tracking refinance activity in 1985.

Paying down mortgages and other debt

Frank Nothaft, Freddie Mac vice president and chief economist, said in a statement:

Consumers are generally shedding debt, and mortgages are just another way they’re doing it. Between 2007 and the third quarter of 2010, mortgage debt declined more than $400 billion, according to the Fed. The estimated volume of net equity cashed out in our report do not account for the homeowners who have paid off their mortgages in their entirety.

Cash-out refinancing

Freddie Mac also reported that the percent of cash-out refinances, in which homeowners cashed out some home equity, fell to a record low. Borrowers who increased their mortgage loan balance by at least 5 percent accounted for 16 percent of mortgage refinancing. The cash-out refinance share has averaged 62 percent over the past 25 years.

Getting a cash-out refinance deal has gotten tougher for many borrowers as the housing crisis has dragged on. Lower home values, high unemployment and tougher lending standards all have put the brakes on the my-house-is-a-piggy-bank mentality that swept America before the housing downturn.

Taking advantage of low mortgage rates

Some savvy homeowners who still have good credit have can use current market conditions to their advantage. Instead of using low mortgage rates to simply lower monthly payments, you can choose to also reduce the amount of principal being refinanced by bringing cash to closing. This strategy can give you a choice of making the new lower payments or continuing to pay down your mortgage faster by sticking with the higher payments you made before refinancing. Either way you end up paying out less interest over the life of the mortgage loan.

When shopping around to compare mortgage loans, let lenders know that you are interest in bring cash to closing to pay down the principal. This could work in your favor and allow you to get a better mortgage rate. Bring cash to closing also could push up your home equity enough to get rid of monthly mortgage insurance (MI) payments.